University returns 300-year-old tapestry looted by Nazis

A 300-year old tapestry, which has hung in the University of Sheffield for half a century, has been returned to France after revelations it had been looted by the Nazis, the Independent reports.

A 300-year old tapestry, which has hung in the University of Sheffield for half a century, has been returned to France after revelations it had been looted by the Nazis, the Independent reports. The university moved swiftly to return the tapestry, which is believed to be worth about £30,000, to the Chateau de Versainville in Normandy after learning of its provenance. Lynne Fox, heritage officer at the university, said: “We were very surprised and shocked. We were satisfied we had bought it in good faith and our immediate response was to give it back. We’re sorry to lose it but we’re proud to bring quite a tragic story to a nice conclusion.”

To read the Independent article in full, click here.

 

Duchess of Cambridge retraces grandmother's steps at Bletchley Park

The Duchess of Cambridge visited Britain’s Second World War codebreaking facility at Bletchley Park this week to mark the end of an £8 million restoration project. The Telegraph reports that she met with codebreakers at the famous site who worked with her grandmother, Valerie Glassborow, who managed the interception of enemy signals for decryption at Bletchley. The restoration project has returned the buildings to their Second World War appearance and created new visitor facilities.

To read the Telegraph article in full, click here.

And to read our 60-second guide to Bletchley Park, click here.

 

Remains of Roman army base found in Austria

Archaeologists in Austria believe they have found the remains of the country's oldest Roman army camp at the historic site of Carnuntum, just east of Vienna. The team at the Ludwig-Boltzmann Institute for Virtual Archaeology discovered the remains, using non-invasive radar scanning technology, the Telegraph reports. The archaeologists believe the camp dates to about 6 AD, which, if confirmed, could make it the winter camp of Emperor Tiberius.

To read the Telegraph article in full, click here.

 

‘Nazi’ facing extradition to Germany

An 89-year-old Philadelphia man faces possible extradition to Germany on charges he aided in the killing of 216,000 Jewish men, women and children at a Nazi death camp. Johann “Hans” Breyer, a retired tool-and-die maker, is being held without bail on allegations stemming from his suspected service as an SS guard at Auschwitz during the Second World War, the Independent reports. He was arrested on Tuesday outside his home in north-east Philadelphia.

To read the Independent article in full, click here.

 

Rare British Guiana stamp sets record at New York auction

A very rare 19th-century postage stamp from a former British colony in South America has sold for a record $9.5m (£5.6m) at auction in New York. According to BBC News it took only two minutes for the British Guiana one-cent magenta stamp to be sold to an anonymous bidder. The stamp had been sold three times before, each time setting the auction record for a single stamp. It measures just 1in by 1in (2.5cm by 2.5cm), and had not been publicly exhibited since 1986.

To read the BBC News article in full, click here.

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